Editor’s Choice: Look Back in Wonder

August 22, 2014
Cover18.5SMDeena and Meb in retrospect
Tito Morales
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

Can it really be 10 years since Deena Kastor’s and Meb Keflezighi’s historic runs at the 2004 Olympic Games?

Thank goodness for the miracle of YouTube and for the timelessness of its content.

Even a decade later, watching Deena enter the Panathenaic Stadium in Athens and witnessing her reaction when she comes to the realization that, yes, she has just earned the bronze medal in the women’s marathon continues to inspire. Her jubilation remains as spontaneous, her relief as raw, and her tears of triumph as heartwarming as they were that magical night in Greece.

“I started crying because there were so many people in those stands who had so much to do with me being there,” Deena says. “My family—I thought about all the amazing and constant support they’d given me since I was 11 years old . . . my ultimate life mentor, Coach Vigil . . . my husband, Andrew . . . my manager, Ray Flynn . . . everybody was there and they were all able to share in that moment.”

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online. Click here to read the entire article…

The idea that brought this runner back from ruin

August 19, 2014

94575660894300935_QpG7YmTY_cby Elinor Fish

Elinor Fish is a writer, coach, ultrarunner and expert in mindful running and natural running form. She is dedicated to helping people improve their health and reduce stress through a sustainable running practice. Elinor’s articles and ideas have been featured in Runner’s World, Los Angeles Times, Yoga Journal, SHAPE, Women, Endurance, Trail Runner, Running Times and many others.

After successfully completing Colorado’s infamous Leadville Trail 100 several years ago, I was on cloud nine, dreaming about my next big endurance challenge. While my imagination soared, my body plummeted into depths of exhaustion I’d never before experienced.

I couldn’t seem to recover from Leadville, and almost a year after the race was over, I still struggled to run for even an hour, and soon even that energy dried up. I was exhausted all the time, barely making it through the workweek so I could spend weekends in bed. Sleepless, lethargic and starting to feel depressed, I knew something was seriously wrong, and that I didn’t want to treat with a prescription.

Seeking solutions, I delved deeply into studying what it true health looks like and what factors most greatly influences our well-being.

What I learned changed the way I view running forever.
Continue reading » The idea that brought this runner back from ruin

From runner to Aid Station Captain

July 10, 2014

zach-150x150With the permission of Zach Adams, we are reprinting this post about how an ultrarunner (usually the one running) takes on the role of aid station captain. For those of you who have manned aid stations, you will be able to identify with Zach. For those of you who are used to aid station workers taking care of you, well … just say “thanks” to your aid station folks next time you’re in a race. Thanks to Zach Adams and Eric Steele of Epic Ultras for letting us post this piece. 

At the inaugural Flint Hills Marathon and 40 Miler I got my first taste of running an aid station for the full duration of a race, and HOLY SHIT was it a real eye-opener! Since I started running ultras about 5 years ago, I have been amazingly taken care of at almost every race I have started. I have had workers fill my bottles, give me food, and offer me everything from a sandwich from their own cooler to Tums out of the glove box of their car. I have stumbled, shuffled, and flown through innumerable aid stations, but I have never worked one. I now realize after working at one, that while I was grateful, I was still taking them for granted. Not anymore. Never again. I realize that I am not unique in that I usually run ultras so I am really excited to share some observations from my first experience from behind the aid station table.

1. It is HARD. You have to show up early and stay late. You have to rush around and get stuff ready before runners get there. You have to load and unload everything. You have to clean as you go. You have to clean, inventory, and repack everything once the last runner comes through. It isn’t running, but it is a LOT of work.

2. It is STRESSFUL. The pressure of being able to quickly and efficiently provide for all the needs of the runners while still cheering them on and infusing them with confidence takes a real toll on you. Waiting for a group of runners to come through and making sure you got them all checked in can leave you worried that you missed someone. You will question yourself. Did I do everything I could for them? Did I find the right drop bag? Did I give them the right bottle back?
Continue reading » From runner to Aid Station Captain

River of No Return Endurance Runs

June 30, 2014

Jenn and Brian speed down to Bayhorse aid station.Jeff and Dondi Black are ultrarunners in Boise, Idaho. A couple of weeks ago, Jeff ran the River of No Return 100K, and Dondi ran the 50K. This was the inaugural year for the RONR and its first year in the Idaho Trail Ultra Series. If you’re considering an ultra in Idaho, check out the ITUS website for other races. RONR was the 3rd in a series of 8 ultras in 2014. Here is Jeff’s race report entitled “Running the River.”

“This was an inaugural race with a potent name:  The River of No Return, or RONR for short.  Given its close proximity to the Frank Church Wilderness to north, the main Salmon River to the south, and the towering Lost River Range to the east, the location was promisingly iconic even before arriving in Challis, Idaho where it all began.  I strapped in for the long 100k course while Dondi rode the rapids on the 50k.” To read the whole article, go to Jeff’s website: http://jeffattheraces.wordpress.com/.

Editor’s Choice: Thank You, Meb

June 26, 2014
Cover18.4SMThank You, Meb
Chris Lotsbom
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

I remember it like it was yesterday: July 7, 2013. It was my 23rd birthday, and I was celebrating in Clevedon, a quaint little seafront town on the Bristol Channel in England. I sat in a beautiful flat with one of my dear friends and her family, bent forward, staring deep into the television’s soul. Hopes and dreams rested on the television screen, ones that were generations in the making.

On that fateful Sunday—the seventh day of the seventh month, 77 years after the last Briton won a men’s Wimbledon Championship title—Scotland’s Andy Murray captured victory at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, snapping one of the longest droughts in sports history. Great Britain had reclaimed the crown at Wimbledon.

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online. Click here to read the entire article…

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