Editor’s Choice: Look Back in Wonder

August 22, 2014
Cover18.5SMDeena and Meb in retrospect
Tito Morales
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

Can it really be 10 years since Deena Kastor’s and Meb Keflezighi’s historic runs at the 2004 Olympic Games?

Thank goodness for the miracle of YouTube and for the timelessness of its content.

Even a decade later, watching Deena enter the Panathenaic Stadium in Athens and witnessing her reaction when she comes to the realization that, yes, she has just earned the bronze medal in the women’s marathon continues to inspire. Her jubilation remains as spontaneous, her relief as raw, and her tears of triumph as heartwarming as they were that magical night in Greece.

“I started crying because there were so many people in those stands who had so much to do with me being there,” Deena says. “My family—I thought about all the amazing and constant support they’d given me since I was 11 years old . . . my ultimate life mentor, Coach Vigil . . . my husband, Andrew . . . my manager, Ray Flynn . . . everybody was there and they were all able to share in that moment.”

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online. Click here to read the entire article…

Editor’s Choice: Thank You, Meb

June 26, 2014
Cover18.4SMThank You, Meb
Chris Lotsbom
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

I remember it like it was yesterday: July 7, 2013. It was my 23rd birthday, and I was celebrating in Clevedon, a quaint little seafront town on the Bristol Channel in England. I sat in a beautiful flat with one of my dear friends and her family, bent forward, staring deep into the television’s soul. Hopes and dreams rested on the television screen, ones that were generations in the making.

On that fateful Sunday—the seventh day of the seventh month, 77 years after the last Briton won a men’s Wimbledon Championship title—Scotland’s Andy Murray captured victory at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, snapping one of the longest droughts in sports history. Great Britain had reclaimed the crown at Wimbledon.

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online. Click here to read the entire article…

Editor’s Choice: Stepping It Up

May 1, 2014
Cover 18.3 temp.inddStepping It Up.
Cara McLaurin Esau
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

Back in my day, we had to walk to and from school, uphill both directions, in 15 feet of snow. Even worse, we had to do any necessary research at the library using actual books. And it was painstaking. If we needed to seek opinions from others, we had to conduct surveys in person or on the phone. Now such labor is no longer necessary—not even among the race directors of popular marathons when they are brainstorming their latest medal designs. Some wise race directors do the same as young whippersnappers do these days: they turn to social media outlets for help. Social media is proving to be a boon for race directors (RDs) who want to improve their medal design to win the hearts and loyalties of their runners.

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online. Click here to read the entire article…

Editor’s Choice: A Letter to Race Volunteers

February 24, 2014
Cover18.2SM
A Letter to Race Volunteers.
Rachel Toor
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

What possesses someone who does not race, who may not even run, to get up at silly hours of the morning to stand outside, in the dark, sometimes in extreme heat but more often in wicked cold, for hour after boring hour, and offer assistance to people who are so involved in what they’re doing that they may not even notice you, let alone offer thanks, is beyond the limits of my small imagination. But nevertheless, at each race I enter, there you are, handing out cups of water, offering up Oreos, encouraging and supporting and cheering. I worship you. I wish I could offer you my first-born child. Or maybe bake you cookies. But I have no children and I can’t bake.

The race director is responsible for explaining your duties, but race directing is about as easy as wrangling cockroaches. So I wanted to take some time first to thank you for your service and then to pass on some comments from runners about how you can be great race volunteers, have fun, and hope to help you understand that runners aren’t as obnoxious as they may seem when they’re out there on the course.

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online.Click here to read the entire article…

Jan/Feb Editor’s Choice: Ode to Joy

January 6, 2014
Cover18.1SMOde to Joy.
Rich Benyo
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

One day after finishing her 25th New York City Marathon, Joy Johnson, who had taken a fall during the marathon at 20 miles where she suffered a head injury but continued the race in spite of it, died while taking a nap in her Manhattan hotel room. She was 86 and the oldest finisher of the famed marathon. She was accompanied to the race by her younger sister, Faith [Anderson], 83, who was with her when she died.

“I want to keep running as long as I can and drop in my running shoes when the time comes,” she stated in a 2011 interview with USA Today.

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online. Click here to read the entire article…

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