Editor’s Choice: Running the 292-Mile Badwater Double

October 23, 2014
Cover18.6SMRunning the 292-Mile Badwater Double
Kenneth A. Posner
© 2014 42K(+) Press, Inc.

In 1977, Al Arnold became the first person to run the 146 miles from the Badwater Basin in Death Valley (which, at 282 feet below sea level, is the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere) to the summit of Mount Whitney (which, at 14,505 feet, is the highest point in the continental USA). In 1989, Tom Crawford and Rich Benyo conceived the idea of doubling this feat and became the first people to complete the 292-mile round trip, which is referred to as a “double” (Benyo 1991). In 2001, Marshall Ulrich set a record for the double of 96:07 as part of his celebrated “quad” crossing (Ulrich 2004). I set out on July 1, 2014, with the goal of completing the double and—if all went perfectly according to plan—of improving on the record. If successful, I would contribute in a small way to the tradition that Tom, Rich, and Marshall established of seeking out extreme challenge in the beautiful but unforgiving environment of Death Valley and the High Sierra—and then raising the bar.

After the experience was over, my crew and I identified several lessons learned that we thought might aid other Badwater runners in such areas as planning, crew leadership, pacing, nutrition, and footgear. We offer these ideas with the goal of inspiring others to take on the Badwater course and to further improve the times for single, double, and other crossings. But first, here’s what happened.

Each issue, we select an “Editor’s Choice”—an entire article we share with you online. Click here to read the entire article…

From runner to Aid Station Captain

July 10, 2014

zach-150x150With the permission of Zach Adams, we are reprinting this post about how an ultrarunner (usually the one running) takes on the role of aid station captain. For those of you who have manned aid stations, you will be able to identify with Zach. For those of you who are used to aid station workers taking care of you, well … just say “thanks” to your aid station folks next time you’re in a race. Thanks to Zach Adams and Eric Steele of Epic Ultras for letting us post this piece. 

At the inaugural Flint Hills Marathon and 40 Miler I got my first taste of running an aid station for the full duration of a race, and HOLY SHIT was it a real eye-opener! Since I started running ultras about 5 years ago, I have been amazingly taken care of at almost every race I have started. I have had workers fill my bottles, give me food, and offer me everything from a sandwich from their own cooler to Tums out of the glove box of their car. I have stumbled, shuffled, and flown through innumerable aid stations, but I have never worked one. I now realize after working at one, that while I was grateful, I was still taking them for granted. Not anymore. Never again. I realize that I am not unique in that I usually run ultras so I am really excited to share some observations from my first experience from behind the aid station table.

1. It is HARD. You have to show up early and stay late. You have to rush around and get stuff ready before runners get there. You have to load and unload everything. You have to clean as you go. You have to clean, inventory, and repack everything once the last runner comes through. It isn’t running, but it is a LOT of work.

2. It is STRESSFUL. The pressure of being able to quickly and efficiently provide for all the needs of the runners while still cheering them on and infusing them with confidence takes a real toll on you. Waiting for a group of runners to come through and making sure you got them all checked in can leave you worried that you missed someone. You will question yourself. Did I do everything I could for them? Did I find the right drop bag? Did I give them the right bottle back?
Continue reading » From runner to Aid Station Captain

River of No Return Endurance Runs

June 30, 2014

Jenn and Brian speed down to Bayhorse aid station.Jeff and Dondi Black are ultrarunners in Boise, Idaho. A couple of weeks ago, Jeff ran the River of No Return 100K, and Dondi ran the 50K. This was the inaugural year for the RONR and its first year in the Idaho Trail Ultra Series. If you’re considering an ultra in Idaho, check out the ITUS website for other races. RONR was the 3rd in a series of 8 ultras in 2014. Here is Jeff’s race report entitled “Running the River.”

“This was an inaugural race with a potent name:  The River of No Return, or RONR for short.  Given its close proximity to the Frank Church Wilderness to north, the main Salmon River to the south, and the towering Lost River Range to the east, the location was promisingly iconic even before arriving in Challis, Idaho where it all began.  I strapped in for the long 100k course while Dondi rode the rapids on the 50k.” To read the whole article, go to Jeff’s website: http://jeffattheraces.wordpress.com/.

Dig Deep Races – Date set for 2014

October 1, 2013
DigDeepPromoPic3_smFor immediate release. Following the huge success of the 2013 Dig Deep Race weekend, which was held at Whirlow Hall Farm earlier this year, Event Organisers Eight Point Two are excited to announce that the 2014 event will be held on the 21st and 22nd of June.

The Dig Deep weekend has earned its place as one of the most highly anticipated race weekends in the UK trail and ultra-running community, with its comprehensive set of races and activities to suit all abilities. With four main races over the weekend, including the Ultra Tour of the Peak District – a brutal but stunning 60 mile course showcasing the best of Peak District trails – to the Whirlow 10k Trail Challenge.

Sponsorship for 2014 has already been finalised and race organiser Ian loombe announced, “We’re delighted to have Mammut as our principal sponsor, with Injinji and Ultimate Direction heavily involved as well. Clif will once again provide the nutrition for the race and Outside will be providing some great retail opportunities giving us a very respectable sponsor package.”

The 2013 event received great feedback, with the goody bags in particular proving to being very popular! Campers were given an overnight bag, which included earplugs, travel pillows and a Mammut cuddly toy. Over the weekend over £1,000 worth of Clif and Injiji freebies and goodies were given out as spot prizes!
Continue reading » Dig Deep Races – Date set for 2014

The North Face Endurance Challenge Races – 10% Discount Code

June 27, 2013

3124nb_09911In our July/August issue, Meghan Hicks writes an article on “The 10 Best Ultras for First-Timers.” One of the series that she profiles is The North Face Endurance Challenge 50K races. Our friends at TNF races are offering a 10% discount for any race distance for the Wisconsin and Georgia events. Use this coupon code to receive your discount:  M&B13 (it is case sensitive).

An ideal course layout for elite speedsters and those taking their first strides in the world of ultra trail running, The Endurance Challenge Wisconsin course is run-able from start to finish, provided that you’ve trained properly. A large portion of the course takes place on the renowned Ice Age Trail located 60 miles southeast of Madison in the southern reaches of the picturesque Kettle Moraine State Park. A hardy test for trail runners of all levels, The North Face® Endurance Challenge at F.D.Roosevelt Park, GA, takes place on the Pine Mountain Ridge on the southern-most edge of the Appalachian Mountain range. The registration fee for these events goes up on July 5, so register now to get your 10% discount! Go to http://www.thenorthface.com/en_US/endurance-challenge/?stop_mobi=yes for more information.

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